Boston

Happy Fourth of July!

For the first time in American history, I made my way 3 hours north from New York City by bus to visit Boston. With zero expectations to cloud my mind, I was delighted by the walk through colonial America via the city’s historic Freedom Trail; a route entirely embedded in the pavement throughout the city, hitting the most iconic landmarks of what remains from the birth of The United State of America.

Near Old North Church, where lanterns were hung as a signal to Paul Revere on the night of his ride, lies The Printing Offices of Edes and Gill. It’s here, where you can see a live demonstration of how a printing press works. Gary Gregory, the printmaster, produces copies of The Declaration of Independence, the same kind that were produced in Philadelphia in order to distribute throughout the then 13 states after it was officially signed.

Behind the printing press you’ll see a case which houses all the letters for type, that are arranged, not alphabetically, but by popularity; the most popular being in the center. This case is also the source of our terms ‘uppercase’ and ‘lowercase’. The uppercase letters having been stored in the top case and the lowercase letters in the bottom. The printer would set the type without looking at the letters, trusting that the apprentice placed them correctly and feeling for a nick, which allowed him to place correctly into the form; upside and backwards.     

Behind the printing press you’ll see a case which houses all the letters for type, that are arranged, not alphabetically, but by popularity; the most popular being in the center. This case is also the source of our terms ‘uppercase’ and ‘lowercase’. The uppercase letters having been stored in the top case and the lowercase letters in the bottom. The printer would set the type without looking at the letters, trusting that the apprentice placed them correctly and feeling for a nick, which allowed him to place correctly into the form; upside and backwards.

 

Boston made the announcement to the public on July 18th, from the east balcony of the Old State House; the oldest remaining public building in the city, a backdrop for the Boston Massacre.

Watch a demonstration of Gary Gregory's work HERE

Not Your Boston Tea Party

As quickly as I arrived back to NYC after the closing of my show in Houston, I left and made my first trip to one of America’s most historic cities, Boston.

Staying at one of Boston’s finer hotel’s, Le Meridien, offers free access to the MIT Museum across the street.

How to officially check into a hotel @jmstevko

The announcement of our complimentary pass to the museum garnered little enthusiasm on my behalf, but turned out to be worth it to learn about the last centuries' greatest technological advancements paired alongside other odd experiments and works of art. On the surface they, seem utterly useless, though I’m sure their creation was an important step in the discovery of new possibilities. A reminder that one must love the process, because it's about the journey, not the destination. 

Hologram of Rosemary H. Jackson, the founder of The Museum of Holography @jmstevko
Arthur Ganson's sculpture at the MIT Museum in Boston @jmstevko
Another Arthur Ganson sculpture, name unknown @jmstevko
Arthur Ganson's "Machine with Wishbone" at the MIT Museum in Boston @jmstevko

View all of Arthur Ganson's Kinetic Sculptures on his website http://www.arthurganson.com/pages/Sculptures.html